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Wednesday, June 18, 2014

20 people - mostly children and women - killed in first attack on Syria refugee camp - Independent.ie

20 people - mostly children and women - killed in first attack on Syria refugee camp - Independent.ie

20 people - mostly children and women - killed in first attack on Syria refugee camp - Independent.ie

20 people - mostly children and women - killed in first attack on Syria refugee camp - Independent.ie

20 people - mostly children and women - killed in first attack on Syria refugee camp - Independent.ie

20 people - mostly children and women - killed in first attack on Syria refugee camp - Independent.ie

20 people - mostly children and women - killed in first attack on Syria refugee camp - Independent.ie

20 people - mostly children and women - killed in first attack on Syria refugee camp - Independent.ie

`Systematic` chemical weapons use in Syria: Watchdog

`Systematic` chemical weapons use in Syria: Watchdog

Tuesday, June 10, 2014

Saturday, June 7, 2014

Plz spread so it reaches Syrian ppl.RT without fail:how to protect from #Sarin + #Chemical Attacks






#Syria #FirstAid How people can protect against Sarin [ #Chemical Weapons ] and what they should do if they are exposed to sarin

Recovery from sarin exposure is possible with treatment, but to be effective, the antidotes available must be used quickly. Therefore, the best thing to do is avoid exposure:
Leave the area where the sarin was released and get to fresh air. Quickly moving to an area where fresh air is available is highly effective in reducing the possibility of death from exposure to sarin vapor.

If the sarin release was outdoors, move away from the area where the sarin was released. Go to the highest ground possible, because sarin is heavier than air and will sink to low-lying areas.
If the sarin release was indoors, get out of the building.
If people think they may have been exposed, they should remove their clothing, rapidly wash their entire body with soap and water, and get medical care as quickly as possible.
Removing and disposing of clothing:
Quickly take off clothing that has liquid sarin on it. Any clothing that has to be pulled over the head should be cut off the body instead of pulled over the head. If possible, seal the clothing in a plastic bag. Then seal the first plastic bag in a second plastic bag. Removing and sealing the clothing in this way will help protect people from any chemicals that might be on their clothes.
If clothes were placed in plastic bags, inform either the local or state health department or emergency personnel upon their arrival. Do not handle the plastic bags.
If helping other people remove their clothing, try to avoid touching any contaminated areas, and remove the clothing as quickly as possible.
Washing the body:
As quickly as possible, wash any liquid sarin from the skin with large amounts of soap and water. Washing with soap and water will help protect people from any chemicals on their bodies.
Rinse the eyes with plain water for 10 to 15 minutes if they are burning or if vision is blurred.
If sarin has been swallowed, do not induce vomiting or give fluids to drink.
Seek medical attention immediately. Consider dialing 911 and explaining what has happened.
How sarin exposure is treated
Treatment consists of removing sarin from the body as soon as possible and providing supportive medical care in a hospital setting. Antidotes are available for sarin. They are most useful if given as soon as possible after exposure.

CDC | Facts About Sarin


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How people can get more information about sarin
People can contact one of the following:

Regional poison control center: 1-800-222-1222
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Public Response Hotline (CDC)
888-232-6348 (TTY)
E-mail inquiries: cdcinfo@cdc.gov
Additional Resources
OSHA. Chemical sampling: sarin [online]. 2010. [cited 2013 May 29]. Available from URL:http://www.osha.gov/dts/chemicalsampling/data/CH_266495.html.
Medical Management Guidelines for Nerve Agents: Tabun (GA); Sarin (GB); Soman (GD); and VX. ATSDR, March 2011.

Pohanka, M; Binder, J; et al. Sarin Assay Using Acetylcholinesterases and Electrochemical Sensor Strip, Defense Science Journal Vol 59(3): 300-304, May 2009.

Dale, TJ and Rebek, J. Nerve Gas Detection in a Fraction of a Second, Angew Chem Int Ed., Sept 2009.

Muse, WT and Thomson, SA. Generation, Sampling, and Analysis for Low-Level GF (Cyclo-Sarin) Vapor for Inhalation Toxicology Studies, Edgewood Chemical Biological Center, U.S. Army Research, Development, and Engineering Command, Aberdeen Proving Grounds, MD, October 2006.

Tokuda Y, Kikuchi M, Takahashi O. Prehospital Management of Sarin Nerve Gas Terrorism in Urban Settings: 10 Years of Progress After the Tokyo Subway Sarin Attack. Resuscitation. Feb 2006;68(2):193-202. [Medline].

National Center for Disaster Preparedness. Atropine Use in Children After Nerve Gas Exposure. Pediatric Expert Advisory Panel (PEAP) Info Brief. Spring 2004.

McDonough JH. Midazolam: An Improved Anticonvulsant Treatment for Nerve Agent Induced Seizures. Defense Technical Information Center. JAN 2002.

Eason, MP. Sarin Exposure: A Simulation Scenario, South Med J. 106(1): 55-62, 2013.

Sarin Causes Autonomic Imbalance and Cardiomyopathy: An Important Issue for Military and Civilian Health, J. Cardiovasc Pharmacol, July 2012.

Herbert H. Hill, Jr. and Stephen J. Martin: Conventional analytical methods for chemical warfare agents*. Pure Appl. Chem., Vol. 74, No. 12, pp. 2281–2291, 2002.

R. M. Black, J. Chromatogr., B: Anal. Technol. Biomed. Life Sci., 2010, 878, 1207–1215.

Smart JK. History of chemical and biological warfare: An American perspective. In: Zaajtchuk R, Bellamy RF, eds. Textbook of Military Medicine, Part 1: Medical Aspects of Chemical and Biological Warfare. Offcieof the Surgeon General, United States Army, 1997; 9-86.

Sidell FR. Nerve agents. In: Zaajtchuk R, Bellamy RF, eds. Textbook of Military Medicine, Part 1: Medical Aspects of Chemical and Biological Warfare. Offcieof the Surgeon General, United States Army, 1997; 129-179.

Lee EC. Clinical manifestations of sarin nerve gas exposure. JAMA. 290(5): 659-662, 2003.
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